The Low-Down on Cash Businesses: How the cash economy impacts business value.

For decades our parents and grandparents were buying and selling businesses based on ‘gut feelings’. They bought on how many coffees sold, or kegs sold or packets of cigarettes sold. They valued based on turnover or rules of thumb. They valued based on cash.

Those days are well and truly behind us, and it’s important that you know what’s changed.

Since the Global Financial Crisis of 2007 we live in a very different world. The uncertainties, and in particular the business practices introduced to resolve those uncertainties, have become a part of the business sales market for good. The practice we’re pointing at in this blog is the now absolute necessity for good financials. Quite simply, if you want to get the value from selling your business that you are hoping for, you absolutely need clearly recorded and verifiable figures. This is to satisfy two primary needs.

  1. New consumer protection laws require that clearly recorded and verifiable figures are needed in order to obtain finance.
    As part of the National Consumer Credit Protection Act 2009, providers of credit services are required to meet a range of new ‘responsible lending obligations’. Amongst other things, lenders are required by law to make enquiries about a borrowers financial situation and to take reasonable steps to verify that situation. Technically this has always been the case; it’s just a lot stricter now. For business buyers that means that everything they provide must be verifiable, must be above board and absolutely cannot be based on unreported cash sales. That might sound like it’s their problem, but if you want them to buy your business, it’s your problem.
    (If you want to know more on this, check out the National Consumer Protection Act 2009, Chapter Three, Division Four. Be warned though- it’s not a page turner)
  2. Buyers are considerably more cautious than they used to be- It’s a Buyer’s Market.
    Though we may have weathered the financial storm of the GFC, there are few who can say that we were left unscathed. The biggest change that the business sales market saw was a change in where buyers see business value- and it’s an important distinction. In the past, buyers saw the value in a business as coming from how much money they could make from it. Now, they see value in a business as coming from how much they will make from it in the worst case scenario. In order for the buyer to determine this, they need verifiable historical figures.

What to do if you have a business with a lot of income that is not being banked:
If you want to sell a business with a lot of unrecorded income, there are two ways do it.

One: Start recording and banking immediately and wait a few more years so that you have some historical financials. For many people the thought of doing that 100% might be horrifying, but remember, though the current setup may be excellent for you personally it could render your business close to unsellable at its full asking price- no matter how much money it is actually making. If you don’t want to do this, the other options is…

Two: Reduce your asking price to a figure represented by your recorded income. Again, this may be horrifying to some people, but you have to remember that in selling a business, you are entering a market where un-recorded income is largely ignored. It that tastes a little sour, keep in mind that though you may achieve a lower return from the sale, you have still benefited from this un-recorded income for as long as the business has been running.

What if you have excellently recorded income?
If you own a traditionally cash operated business where you have a long history and everything is recorded and “on the books” then you are in a very good position to sell. Good figures in these industries helps your business stand out and you should sell quickly in the current market for a good price.

If you would like to talk to an agent today and would like to know how to sell a business with your current circumstances call Xcllusive Business Brokers on (02) 9817 3331. We look forward to talking to you about your situation.

By Zoran Sarabaca

Principal of Xcllusive Business Sales
Sell your business with Certainty

 

 

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this blog is for information purposes only. It is not meant to be considered as business advice. The points of view expressed represent reactions to the current business market and it should be noted that the market may be subject to change in the future. Reader’s specific circumstances may be different and have not been taken into consideration. Always consult with your professional advisors for any business advice.

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You will close the deal if you let the buyer see everything

Playing your cards close to your chest may be the way to go in business, but not if you are trying to sell it for the best price.

So you have a potential buyer for your business. Congratulations! Marketing or advertising your business has paid off…so far.

Only when a prospect is sure that your business is going to go on making money into the future will you be able to close the deal. So the mantra is: “Don’t look as if you are holding back. Give them everything.”

Getting people to look at the sale of your business more closely is admirable, but getting the deal across the line is a whole other ball game. It usually means full access to all paperwork. Be prepared to go into everything, so the purchaser of your business can see where the good supersedes the difficulty.

Transparency

Your business operations must be transparent. If it’s all too much homework, raises too many questions or just looks too har, the chances are you may lose your buyer.

If they don’t understand your business quickly they will lose confidence.

You can give a buyer “everything” without having to give away your best trade secrets if you focus on what’s in it for them. Brush up your track record. Lay out your business potential. Reveal hidden strategies and point out where further savings can be made.

Zoran Sarabaca

Principal

Xcllusive

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